• Posted by Konstantin 04.12.2011

    There is one rule of thumb that I find quite useful and happen to use fairly often. It is probably not widely known nor described in textbooks (I stumbled upon it on my own), so I regularly have to explain it.  Next time I'll just point out to this post.

    The rule is the following: a proportion estimate obtained on a sample of n points should only be trusted up to an error of \frac{1}{\sqrt{n}}.

    For example, suppose that you read in the newspaper that "25% of students like statistics". Now, if this result has been obtained from a survey of 64 participants, you should actually interpret the answer as 0.25\pm\frac{1}{\sqrt{64}}, that is, 0.25\pm 0.125, which means that the actual percentage lies somewhere between 12.5% and 37.5%.

    As another example, in machine learning, you often get to see cases where someone evaluates two classification algorithms on a test set of, say, 400 instances, measures that the first algorithm has a precision of 90%, the second a precision of, say, 92%, and boldly claims the dominance of the second algorithm. At this point, without going deeply into statistics, it is easy to figure that 1/\sqrt{400} should be somewhere around 5%, hence the difference between 90% and 92% is not too significant to celebrate.

    The Explanation

    The derivation of the rule is fairly straightforward. Consider a Bernoulli-distributed random variable with parameter p. We then take an i.i.d. sample of size n, and use it to estimate \hat p:

        \[\hat p = \frac{1}{n}\sum_i X_i\]

    The 95% confidence interval for this estimate, computed using the normal approximation is then:

        \[\hat p \pm 1.96\sqrt{\frac{p(1-p)}{n}}\]

    What remains is to note that 1.96\approx 2 and that \sqrt{p(1-p)} \leq 0.5. By substituting those two approximations we immediately get that the interval is at most

        \[\hat p \pm \frac{1}{\sqrt{n}}\]

    Limitations

    It is important to understand the limitations of the rule. In the cases where the true proportion estimate is p=0.5 and n is large enough for the normal approximation to make sense (20 is already good), the one-over-square-root-of-n rule is very close to a true 95% confidence interval.

    When the true proportion estimate is closer to 0 or 1, however, \sqrt{p(1-p)} is not close to 0.5 anymore, and the rule of thumb results in a conservatively large interval.

    In particular, the true 95% confidence interval for p=0.9 will be nearly two times smaller (\approx 0.6/\sqrt{n}). For p=0.99 the actual interval is five times smaller (\approx 0.2/\sqrt{n}). However, given the simplicity of the rule, the fact that the true p is rarely so close to 1, and the idea that it never hurts to be slightly conservative in statistical estimates, I'd say the one-over-a-square-root-of-n rule is a practically useful tool in most situations.

    Posted by Konstantin @ 2:51 am

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  • 1 Comment

    1. Ankur on 11.01.2012 at 15:53 (Reply)

      Hallo Konstantin,

      thanks for the post. I remember learning this during my masters but couldnt remember what this thumb rule wass called or why it is so.. so I finally searched for 'one over root n'. Apparently Google only works if you know what you're looking for 🙂

      I think it's a super helpful tool because of its simplicity! (Not easy to explain to laymen or people in the business world why the 1/root(n) but good for a confidence estimation for oneself!)

      Best
      Ankur

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