• Posted by Konstantin 22.03.2015 4 Comments

    This is a repost of my quora answer to the question: In layman's terms, how does Naive Bayes work?

    Suppose that you are a working as a security guard at the airport. Your task is to look at people who pass the security line and pick some of them as being worthy of a more detailed screening. Now, of course, telling whether a person is a potential criminal or not by just looking at him/her is hard, if at all possible, but you need to do something. You have been put there for some reason, after all.

    One of the simplest ways to approach the problem, mentally, is the following. You assign a "risk value" for each person. At the beginning (when you don't have any information about the person at all) you set this value to zero.

    Now you start studying various features of the person in front of you: is it a male or a female? Is it a kid? Is he behaving nervously? Is he carrying a big bag? Is he alone? Did the metal detector beep? Is he a foreigner? etc. For each of those features you know (subconsciously due to your presuppositions, or from actual statistics) the average increase or decrease in risk of the person being a criminal that it entails. For example, if you know that the proportion of males among criminals is the same as the proportion of males among non-criminals, observing that a person is male will not affect his risk value at all. If, however, there are more males among criminals (suppose the percentage is, say, 70%) than among decent people (where the proportion is around 50%), observing that a person in front of you is a male will increase the "risk level" by some amount (the value is log(70%/50%) ~ 0.3, to be precise). Then you see that a person is nervous. OK, you think, 90% of criminals are nervous, but only 50% of normal people are. This means that nervousness should entail a further risk increase (of log(0.9/0.5) ~ 0.6, to be technical again, so by now you have counted a total risk value of 0.9). Then you notice it is a kid. Wow, there is only 1% of kids among criminals, but around 10% among normal people. Therefore, the risk value change due to this observation will be negative (log(0.01/0.10) ~ -2.3, so your totals are around -1.4 by now).

    You can continue this as long as you want, including more and more features, each of which will modify your total risk value by either increasing it (if you know this particular feature is more representative of a criminal) or decreasing (if the features is more representative of a decent person). When you are done collecting the features, all is left for you is to compare the result with some threshold level. Say, if the total risk value exceeds 10, you declare the person in front of you to be potentially dangerous and take it into a detailed screening.

    The benefit of such an approach is that it is rather intuitive and simple to compute. The drawback is that it does not take the cross-play of features into account. It may very well be the case that while the feature "the person is a kid" on its own greatly reduces the risk value, and the feature "has a moustache" on its own has close to no effect, a combination of the two ("a kid with a moustache") would actually have to increase the risk by a lot. This would not happen when you simply add the separate feature contributions, as described above.

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  • Posted by Konstantin 15.03.2015 2 Comments

    Anyone who has had to deal with scientific literature must have encountered Postscript (".ps") files. Although the popularity of this format is gradually fading behind the overwhelming use of PDFs, you can still find .ps documents on some major research paper repositores, such as arxiv.org or citeseerx. Most people who happen to produce those .ps or .eps documents, do it using auxiliary tools, most commonly while typesetting their papers in LaTeX, or while preparing images for those papers using a vector graphics editor (e.g. Inkscape). As a result, Postscript tends to be regarded by the majority of its users as some random intermediate file format, akin to any of the myriad of other vector graphics formats.

    I find this situation unfortunate and unfair towards Postscript. After all, PS is not your ordinary vector graphics format. It is a fully-fledged Turing-complete programming language, that is well thought through and elegant in its own ways. If it were up to me, I would include a compulsory lecture on Postscript into any modern computer science curriculum. Let me briefly show you why.

    Stack-based programming

    Firstly, PostScript is perhaps the de-facto standard example of a proper purely stack-based language in the modern world. Other languages of this group are nowadays either dead, too simpletoo niche, or not practical. Like any stack language, it looks a bit unusual, yet it is simple to reason about and its complete specification is decently short. Let me show you some examples:

    2 2 add     % 2+2 (the two numbers are pushed to the stack,
                % then the add command pops them and replaces with
                % the resulting value 4)
    /x 2 def                  % x := 2 (push symbol "x", push value 2,
                              %         pop them and create a definition)
    /y x 2 add def            % y := x + 2 (you get the idea)
    (Hello!) show             % print "Hello!"
    x 0 gt {(Yes) show} if    % if (x > 0) print "Yes"

    Adding in a couple of commands commands that specify font parameters and current position on the page, we may write a perfectly valid PS file that would perform arithmetic operations, e.g:

    /Courier 10 selectfont   % Font we'll be using
    72 720 moveto            % Move cursor to position (72pt, 720pt)
                             % (0, 0) is the lower-left corner
    (Hello! 2+2=) show
    2 2 add                  % Compute 2+2
    ( ) cvs                  % Convert the number to a string.
                             % (First we had to provide a 1-character
                             % string as a buffer to store the result)
    show                     % Output "4"

    Computer graphics

    Postscript has all the basic facilities you'd expect from a programming language: numbers, strings, arrays, dictionaries, loops, conditionals, basic input/output. In addition, being primarily a 2D graphics language, it has all the standard graphics primitives. Here's a triangle, for example:

    newpath           % Define a triangle
        72 720 moveto
        172 720 lineto
        72 620 lineto
    closepath
    gsave             % Save current path
    10 setlinewidth   % Set stroke width
    stroke            % Stroke (destroys current path)
    grestore          % Restore saved path again
    0.5 setgray       % Set fill color
    fill              % Fill

    Postscript natively supports the standard graphics transformation stack:

    /triangle {       % Define a triangle of size 1 n the 0,0 frame
        newpath
            0 0 moveto
            1 0 lineto
            0 1 lineto
        closepath
        fill
    } def
    
    72 720 translate      % Move origin to 72, 720
    gsave                 % Push current graphics transform
        -90 rotate        % Draw a rotated triangle
        72 72 scale       % .. with 1in dimensions
        triangle
    grestore              % Restore back to non-scaled, non-rotated frame
    gsave
        100 0 translate   % Second triangle will be next to the first one
        32 32 scale       % .. smaller than the first one
        triangle          % .. and not rotated
    grestore

    Here is the result of the code above:

    Two triangles

    Two triangles

    The most common example of using a transformation stack is drawing fractals:

    /triangle {
        newpath
            0 0 moveto
            100 0 lineto
            0 -100 lineto
        closepath
        fill
    } def
    
    /sierpinski {
        dup 0 gt
        {
            1 sub
            gsave 0.5 0.5 scale dup sierpinski grestore
            gsave 50 0 translate 0.5 0.5 scale dup sierpinski grestore
            gsave 0 -50 translate 0.5 0.5 scale sierpinski grestore
        }
        { pop triangle }
        ifelse
    } def
    72 720 translate  % Move origin to 72, 720
    5 5 scale
    5 sierpinski
    Sierpinski triangle

    Sierpinski triangle

    With some more effort you can implement nonlinear dynamic system (Mandelbrot, Julia) fractals, IFS fractals, or even proper 3D raytracing in pure PostScript. Interestingly, some printers execute PostScript natively, which means all of those computations can happen directly on your printer. Moreover, it means that you can make a document that will make your printer print infinitely many pages. So far I could not find a printer that would work that way, though.

    System access

    Finally, it is important to note that PostScript has (usually read-only) access to the information on your system. This makes it possible to create documents, the content of which depends on the user that opens it or machine where they are opened or printed. For example, the document below will print "Hello, %username", where %username is your system username:

    /Courier 10 selectfont
    72 720 moveto
    (Hi, ) show
    (LOGNAME) getenv {} {(USERNAME) getenv pop} ifelse show
    (!) show

    I am sure, for most people, downloading a research paper from arxiv.org that would greet them by name, would probably seem creepy. Hence this is probably not the kind of functionality one would exploit with good intentions. Indeed, Dominique has an awesome paper that proposes a way in which paper reviewers could possibly be deanonymized by including user-specific typos in the document. Check out the demo with the source code.

    I guess this is, among other things, one of the reasons we are going to see less and less of Postscript files around. But none the less, this language is worth checking out, even if only once.

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  • Posted by Konstantin 09.03.2015 No Comments

    Playing cards are a great tool for modeling, popularizing and explaining various mathematical and algorithmic notions. Indeed, a deck of cards is a straightforward example for a finite set, a discrete distribution or a character string. Shuffling and dealing cards represents random sampling operations. A card hand denotes information possessed by a party. Turning card face down or face up looks a lot like bit flipping. Finally, card game rules describe an instance of a particular algorithm or a protocol. I am pretty sure that for most concepts in maths or computer science you can find some card game or a card trick that is directly related to it. Here are some examples of how you can simulate a simple computing machineillustrate inductive reasoning or explain map-reduce, in particular.

    Cryptographers seem to be especially keen towards playing cards. Some cryptographic primitives could have been inspired by them. There are decently secure ciphers built upon a deck of cards. Finally, there are a couple of very enlightening card-based illustrations of such nontrivial cryptographic concepts as zero-knowledge proofs and voting protocols. The recent course on secure two-party computation given by abhi shelat at the last week's EWSCS extended my personal collection of such illustrations with another awesome example — a secure two-party protocol for computing the AND function. As I could not find a description of this protocol anywhere in the internet (and abhi did not know who is the author), I thought it was worth being written up in a blog post here (along with a small modification of my own).

    The Tinder Game

    Consider the situation, where Alice and Bob want to find out, whether they are both interested in each other (just as if they were both users of the Tinder app). More formally, suppose that Alice has her private opinion about Bob represented as a single bit (where "0" means "not interested" and "1" means "interested"). Equivalently, Bob has his private opinion about Alice represented in the same way. They need to find out whether both bits are "1". However, if it is not the case, they would like to keep their opinions private. For example, if Alice is not interested in Bob, Bob would prefer Alice not to know that he is all over her. Because, you know, opinion asymmetry may lead to awkward social dynamics when disclosed, at least among college students.

    The following simple card game happens to solve their problem. Take five cards, so that three of them are red and two are black. The cards of one color must be indistinguishable from each other (e.g. you can't simply take three different diamonds for the reds). Deal one black and one red card to Alice, one black and one red card to Bob. Put the remaining red card on the table face up.

    Initial table configuration

    Initial table configuration

    Now Alice will put her two cards face down to the left of the open card, and Bob will put his two cards to the right of the open card:

    Alice and Bob played

    Alice and Bob played

    The rules for Alice and Bob are simple: if you like the other person, put your red card next to the central red card. Otherwise, put your black card next to the central one. For example, if both Alice and Bob like each other, they would play their cards as follows (albeit still face down):

    What Alice and Bob would play if they both liked each other

    What Alice and Bob would play if they both liked each other

    Now the middle card is also turned face down, and all five cards are collected, preserving their order:

    Five cards collected, preserving order

    Five cards collected, preserving order

    Next, Alice cuts this five-card deck, moving some number of cards from the top to the bottom (Bob should not know exactly how many). Then Bob cuts the deck (also making sure that Alice does not know how many cards he cuts). The result is equivalent to applying some cyclic rotation to the five card sequence yet neither Bob nor Alice knows how many cards were shifted in total.

    The five cards can now be opened by dealing them in order onto the table to find out the result. If there happen to be three red cards one after another in a row or two black cards one after another, Alice and Bob both voted "yes". Here is one example of such a situation. It is easy to see that it is a cyclic shift of the configuration with three red aces in the middle shown above.

    Both voted "yes"

    Both voted "yes"

    Otherwise, if neither three red aces nor two black aces are side by side, we may conclude that one or both of the players voted "no". However, there is absolutely no way to find out anything more specific than that. Here is an example:

    No mutual affection (or no affection at all)

    No mutual affection (or no affection at all)

    Obviously, this result could not be obtained as a cyclic shift of the configuration with three aces clumped together. On the other hand, it could have been obtained as a cyclic shift from any of the three other alternatives ("yes-no", "no-no" and "no-yes"), hence if Alice voted "no" she will have no way of figuring out what was Bob's vote. Thus, playing cards along with a cryptographic mindset helped Alice and Bob discover their mutual affection or the lack of it without the risk of awkward situations. Isn't it great?

    Throwing in a Zero-Knowledge Proof

    There are various ways Alice or Bob can try to "break" this protocol while still trying to claim honesty. One possible example is shown below:

    Alice is trying to cheat

    Alice is trying to cheat

    Do you see what happened? Alice has put her ace upside down, which will later allow her to understand what was Bob's move (yet she can easily pretend that turning a card upside down was an honest mistake). Although the problem is easily solved by picking a deck with asymmetric backs, for the sake of example, let us assume that such a solution is somewhy unsuitable. Perhaps there are no requisite decks at Alice and Bob's disposal, or they need to have symmetric backs for some other reasons. This offers a nice possibility for us to practice even more playing card cryptography and try to secure the original algorithm from such "attacks" using a small imitation of a zero-knowledge proof for turn correctness.

    Try solving it yourself before proceeding.

    Read more...

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